In my continuing quest into the history of my ancestors, I have come across some interesting history for my fellow Kohanim Levite relatives around the globe. This research proves that Kohanim had a big influence on the ancient cosmopolitan city of Athens, Greece in approximately 6 BC. A time when Athens ruled much of the world and instituted the archon laws of Solon -AKA Epimenides the Cretan (Rule of Law).

As I have explained in my previous articles on the Kohanim, a person (race) who comes from the island Kos (Coos) is called a Koan in English, and a Cohen or Kohen (or Kohain; Hebrew: כֹּהֵן, “priest”, pl. כֹּהֲנִים Kohanim) which is simply the Hebrew word for priest. To get up to speed on this history,  I suggest you read my previous articles, The Origins of the Kohen PriesthoodDragon Isle: The Kohen of the Lost Island of DiaThe Royal Purple Silk ProstituteThe Lost Priesthood of the Kohen,and Kohen Levite DNA.

The Scripture states that the Kohanim were consecrated to serve in the Sanctuary of the Temple as the High Priests of Ancient Israel up to the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE.  The “legal descendants of Aaron,” who was the first kohen gadol; high priest of Israel, who were designated as the priestly class, the kohanim

Now, a barren wasteland that was once home to some of the most famous people in the ancient world.

The research I found that connects the Kohanim Levites to ancient Athens is from the Hungarian scholar Gyorgy Nemeth who created a list of all the foreigners living in Athens during the 6th-5th centuries BC based on their place of origin. (Transcribed by Dienekes Pontikos)

Nemeth found that the top sources of foreigners was from the island of Cues, AKA Kos, now known as Dia. Here is his list (out of 337 known):

Ceos (Greek island) 15
Plataiai (Greek city) 14
Samos (Greek island) 11
Thrace (territory) 8
Miletos (Greek city) 7
Megara (Greek city) 7
Syrakousai (Greek city) 7
Thasos (Greek island) 7
Aigina (Greek island) 6
Torone (Greek city) 6
Caria (territory in SW. Asia Minor) 6

Read more from  Dienekes Pontikos

Therefore, we can safely say that the Kohanim had most likely had a significant influence upon ancient Greek civilization. This makes perfect sense given the fact that their priests were some of the most famous healers and wise men to ever live in this region of the world such as  Prodicus (Greek: Πρόδικος, Pródikos; c. 465 BC – c. 395 BC), a Greek philosopher, who was part of the first generation of Sophists who went to Athens as an ambassador from Dia (Kos)

There are many other world-famous people and families that had hailed from the ancient island of Kos that I have documented on my blog before such as the Father of Medicine, Hippocrates  (Greek: Ἱπποκράτης; Hippokrátēs; c. 460 BC – c. 370 BC) who was born there, and also where he had operated his world-famous school of medicine.

SOURCES:

[1] Nemeth, G. (2001) Metics in Athens, Acta Ant. Hung. 41, 2001, 331-348 
[2] The Foreign Residents of Athens: An Annex to the Lexicon of Greek Personal Names: Attica, by Michael J. Osborne and Sean G. Byrne (British Academy)

Moe is the founder of GnosticWarrior.com. A website dedicated to both the ancient and modern teachings of Gnosticism.

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