The reason I write about DNA often, is because understanding our DNA is a very important aspect of being a Gnostic. A DNA test helps us find the long-lost history of our ancestors pasts, which then assists us in comprehending who we are and why we do the things we do.

My YDNA Haplogroup is E1b1b1c1 M123+. My DNA certificate states that on my paternal side, my YDNA is Phoenician, Celtic and Hellenes, which is Greek.

My parents were French Canadian who thought they were just French. My father said that the original Bedards may have come to France by way of Germany. Never did I hear anyone in my family mention our Greek, Phoenician or Jewish ancestors. They all just assumed that our Catholic family had come to North America by way of France, then to Canada, and finally arriving here in the United States. However, now with the advent of DNA science and the Genome Project, this Bedard (me) can change hundreds of years of family ignorance into ancestral wisdom with just a little blog.

The facts are that our ancestors live on in our own blood. The rewriting of history and centuries of propaganda cannot change this DNA reality.

Greek DNA Haplogroups

Northern Greeks (Thrace & Macedonia) (296 samples)
I : 21.6
R1a : 18.2
R1b : 13.2
E1b : 20.6
G2 : 4.7
J2 : 14.9
J1 : 3.4
LT : 2.7
* : 0.7

Central Greeks (Epirus & Thessaly) (127 samples)
I : 12.6
R1a : 11.8
R1b : 10.2
E1b : 31.5
G2 : 6.3
J2 : 18.1
J1 : 3.9
LT : 3.9
* : 1.6

Southern Greeks (Sterea Hellas & Peloponnese) (264 samples)
I : 12.9
R1a : 10.2
R1b : 20.5
E1b : 25.8
G2 : 3.4
J2 : 19.7
J1 : 2.3
LT : 3.8
* : 1.5

Eastern Greeks (Aegean islands & Ionia) (158 samples)
I : 11.4
R1a : 7.6
R1b : 22.8
E1b : 20.3
G2 : 8.2
J2 : 19.6
J1 : 5.1
LT : 3.2
* : 1.9

Cretan Greeks (Crete) (193 samples)
I : 13.0
R1a : 8.8
R1b : 17.1
E1b : 8.8
G2 : 10.9
J2 : 30.6
J1 : 8.3
LT : 2.6
*: –

All Greeks (1038 samples)
I : 15.1
R1a : 12.0
R1b : 16.9
E1b : 21.0
G2 : 6.3
J2 : 20.1
J1 : 4.3
LT : 3.2
*: 1.1

Highest contrast: E1b1b samples the highest at 31.5% in C. Greece & the lowest in Crete E1b1b 8.8%; this alone moves E1b1b at least 5%, because it effected the frequencies of other regions that are much higher than 8.8%, especially that none of the sample had 45% peak samples to reduce the 8.8% in Crete!

E1b1b (+5) ————26%

Moderate contrast: R1b is the lowest in Central Greece at 10.2% & slightly above average in Crete at 17.1%; this sampling disparity should be represented by a 1.5% point adjustment
R1b (-1.5) ———— 14%

J2, J1 & G2 also peak in Greece, but those have moderate effect
J2 (-2) ————— 21%
J1 composite was 5% goes down to 3% (which is already there)
G2 (-0.5)———— 6.5%

LT is 4.5% on the table, but all studies samples are under 4%, so it should be
LT (-1)—————-3.5%

SOURCES:

Sure
1.The Genetic Legacy of Paleolithic Homo sapiens sapiens in Extant Europeans: A
Y Chromosome Perspective (Semino et.al) 2000
2.Paternal and maternal lineages in the Balkans show a homogeneous landscape over linguistic barriers, except for the isolated Aromuns (Bosch et.al) 2005
3.Y-chromosomal evidence of the cultural diffusion of agriculture in southeast Europe (Battaglia et.al) 2008
4.Y-chromosomal evidence for a limited Greek contribution to the Pathan population of Pakistan (Firasat et.al) 2007
5.Clinal patterns of human Y chromosomal diversity in continental Italy and Greece are dominated by drift and founder effects (Di Giaccomo et.al) 2003
6.The coming of the Greeks to Provence and Corsica: Y-chromosome models of archaic Greek colonization of the western Mediterranean (King et.al) 2011
7. Differential Y-chromosome Anatolian Influences on the Greek and Cretan Neolithic (King et.al) 2008
8. Eupedia

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