E1b1b1c M123+ HaploGroup

“And God shall scatter you among all the peoples from one end of the earth to the other end of the earth…” Devorim 28:64

“And God shall return your captivity and be merciful to you, and will return and gather you from all the nations whither God has scattered you.” Devorim 30:3

“As the natural laws are set before Me, so shall the seed of Israel never cease from being a nation before Me, forever.” Yirmiyahu 31:36

Isaiah 35:7 ‘And the parched ground shall become a pool, and the thirsty land springs of water: in the habitation of dragons, where each lay, shall be leeks with reeds and rushes’.

The E1B1 is the Samaritan Kohanim gene from the Tribe of Levi who were ordained by God to be Priests

If anyone would like to try and debate my findings in this article and or comment, please do so below. I would love to hear from you.Maurice Bedard 11/28/2011

* YDNA blood type as E1b1b1c M123+. This Haplogroup is known to have originate in Northern Africa where we later settled in Israel, Ireland, Germany, England , France, Canada and the United States.

In human genetics, Y HaplogroupE1b1b (E-M215) previously known as E3b (or “haplotype V”[4]) is one of the major paternal lines of humanity, linking from father-to-son back to a common male ancestor. E1b1b1c (E-M123), formerly E3b1c or E3b3, is mostly known for its major sub-clade E1b1b1c1 (E-M34), which dominates this clade.

  • YDNA HAPLOGROUP: E1b1b1c M123+ (verified by IGENEA)
  • HAPLOGROUP ORIGINS: North Africa
  • OLD TESTAMENT TRIBE: Tribe of Levi
  • ORDAINED BY GOD: As the priestly class
  • OUR SKIN COLOR: White, but with the ability to become very dark due to our North African Origins. A common theme through history in Beda’s is that we are described as dark, black or curly black hair. On a family side note, my skin gets very dark and my hair is curly
  • Famous Family & Cousins:  Saint Bede (Beda), Noel Beda, President Barack Obama, Adolph Hitler, Gadaffi

FamilyTreeDNA:

The E haplogroup has been observed in all Jewish groups world wide. One of its major subclades, E1b1b (formerly E3b) is considered to be the 2nd most prevalent haplogroup among the Jewish population.

According to one major paper, Contrasting patterns of Y chromosome variation in Ashkenazi Jewish and host non-Jewish European populations E-M35, which defines the E1b1b1 (formerly E3b1) haplogroup, is considered to be the second highest, next to J, for “Founding Jewish Lineages” in Europe. It is found in moderate amounts in all Jewish populations, from Ashkenazi, Sephardic, Kurdish, Yemen, Samaritan and even among Djerba Jewish groups.

The Samaritan Kohanim belong to haplogroup E1b1b1a (formerly known as E3b1a).

Y Chromosome of Jewish Priests:

According the biblical accounts, the Jewish priesthood was established about 3,300 years ago with the appointment of the first Israelite high priest. Designation of Jewish males to the priesthood continues to this day, and is determined by strict patrilineal decent. Accordingly, we sought and found clear differences in the frequency of Y-chromosomes haplotypes between Jewish priests and their lay counterparts. Remarkably, the difference is observable in both Ashkenazi and Sephardic populations, despite the geographical separation of the two communities.

The human Y chromosome has useful properties for studies of molecular evolution. Except for the pseudo-autosomal region, it is inherited paternally and does not recombine. It can be used to construct patrilineal genealogy cladograms complementary to those formulated using maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA.

Samaritans:

Their findings reported on four family lineages among the Samaritans: the Tsdaka family (tradition: tribe of Menasseh), the Joshua-Marhiv and Danfi families (tradition: tribe of Ephraim), and the Cohen family (tradition: tribe of Levi). All Samaritan families were found in haplogroups J1 and J2, except the Cohen family which was found in haplogroup E3b1a-M78.[7] This article predated the E3b1a subclades based on the research of Cruciani, et al.[8] The Samaritan Cohen family were Levites until the previous Cohen family died out around 1700, so the fact that they don’t share CMH is expected. These findings may offer more proof that E1b1 was one of the founding lineages of the Levites.

More on the Samaritans:

The Samaritan community in the Middle East survives as a distinct religious and cultural sect and constitutes one of the oldest and smallest ethnic minorities in the world, numbering just less than 700 members. As a religious sect, reportedly, the Samaritans broke away from the mainstream Judaism around the fifth century BCE but according to Samaritan accounts it was the southern tribes that left the original worship set forth by Joshua. The Samaritans have maintained their religion and history to this day. Samaritans claim to descend from the Biblical Israelite tribes of Ephraim, Menashe and Levi.

Since the Samaritans maintain extensive and detailed genealogical records for the past 13–15 generations (approximately 400 years)and further back, it is possible to construct accurate pedigrees and specific maternal and paternal lineages. Y-Chromosome studies have shown that the majority of Samaritans belong to haplogroups J1 and J2, while the Samaritan Kohanim belong to haplogroup E1b1b1a (formerly known as E3b1a).[2] However, the last member of the Samaritan High-Priestly family, which claimed descent from Eleazar, the son of Aaron, died in 1623 or 1624. There was a time in later periods like the 17-18Th centuries that Samaritan sages by mistake wrote to European scholars that their priests are from Uziel b. Kehat. But Samaritan sources, chronicles and lists of lineage connecting the Samaritan Priests of the last 387 years since 1624 [The year that the Priestly Family from Phinhas was ceased] to Itamar b. Aaron the nephew of Moses, meaning that they are all from Aaronic origin. All Samaritan Priests of the present are linked to the father of the family that lived in the 14Th century ‘Abed Ela b. Shalma that was the House of ‘Abtaa from Itamar, son of Aaron. Since that date the priest has called himself “Ha-Kohen Ha-Lewi”, which means the Priest-Levite, instead of “Ha-Kohen Ha-Gadol”, a title which referred to the High-Priest as in previous times.

The biblical tradition of the Cohen family living among the Samaritans is found in 2 Kings 17:27-28, where it indicates that only one Israelite Cohen was sent back from exile from Assyria by the King of Assyria to teach those living in the Northern Kingdom of Israel (Samaria). This suggests why some Samaritans may claim association of haplogroup E3b1a with the biblical Kohanim. In the same period only 27,290 (Annals of Sargon)of the ten Northern Tribes were exiled to Assyria, the Assyrians relocated those non-Israelites to the region around Samaria, explaining why those claiming to be Leviim or Kohanim were actually Syrians, who appointed other non-Israelites as priests (“Kohanim”) from their own people.

Thus far, no claims of ancestry of coming from the Levite tribe for male haplogroups outside of the “J” series can be scientifically substantiated because the mutation of haplogroups is so slow that no one coming from the family of Levi could have another haplogroup.

The Text Below Taken From: Multiple Origins of Ashkenazi Levites and Y Chromosomes Traveling South:

The E1b1b1 haplogroup (formerly known as haplogroup E3b1) has been observed in all Jewish groups worldwide. It is considered to be the second most prevalent haplogroup among the Jewish population. According to one major paper it has also been observed in moderate numbers among individuals from Ashkenazi, Sephardic and Samaritan communities having traditions of descending from the tribe of Levi, suggesting that the E1b1b1 Levites may have existed in Israel before the Diaspora of 70 C.E.

The Samaritan community is a small, isolated, and highly endogamous group today numbering some 650 members who have maintained extensive genealogical records for the past 13–15 generations. Since the Samaritans maintain extensive and detailed genealogical records, it is possible to construct accurate pedigrees and specific maternal and paternal lineages. The Samaritan community in the Middle East survives as a distinct religious and cultural sect and constitutes one of the oldest and smallest ethnic minorities in the world. Y-Chromosome studies have shown that the majority of Samaritans belong to haplogroups J1 and J2 while the Samaritan Cohanim belong to haplogroup E1b1b1a, formerly E3b1a.

In 1623-1624 the last member of the High-Priestly family, which claimed descent from Eleazar, the son of Aaron, died. The office was then given to a Levite branch, descended from Uzziel, the son of Kohath. Since that date the priest has called himself “Ha-Kohen Ha-Lewi”, which means the Priest-Levite, instead of “Ha-Kohen Ha-Gadol”, a title which referred to the High-Priest as in previous times. The approximately 650 individuals comprising the total group of present day Samaritans trace their ancestry over a period of more than 2,000 years to the Biblical Israelite tribes of Ephraim, Menashe and Levi. As a religious sect, the Samaritans broke away from the main stream of Judaism around the fifth century B.C..

The biblical tradition of the origin of the Cohen family among the Samaritans is found in 2 Kings 17:27-28 where it indicates that only one Israelite Cohen was sent back from exile in Assyria, circa 722 BC, by the King of Assyria to teach those living in the Northern Kingdom of Israel (Samaria); this suggests a strong association of haplogroup E3b1a with the biblical Cohenim who authored and compiled the biblical text of the Book of Kings. Those non-Israelites relocated to the region around Samaria by the Assyrians in the same period that the Northern Tribes were exiled to Assyria, later appointed other non-Israelite Cohenim from their own people who were performing non-Israelite authorized priestly functions as observed by the biblical, priestly author at the time of the composition of the Book of Second Kings (cf. 2 Kings 17:32-34); this may be an origin for some among the J1 and J2 Cohenim haplotypes observed among Jewish populations today.

Phylogeny of E1b1:

A “by lineage” nomenclature system [21] was used to name the haplogroups. For the sake of clarity, the internal structure of haplogroups E-M191 (six sub-haplogroups), E-M78 (11 sub-haplogroups) and E-M81 (3 sub-haplogroups) is not shown. Paragroups E1b1*, E1b1a* and E1b1b* were never observed in our data set (more than 2,000 African Y chromosomes, data not shown). Note that the mutations M154 and M281 have been repositioned (B) with respect to the previously published phylogeny (A); however, the possibility that M154 and M281 are recurrent mutations cannot be excluded. The positions of the mutations M116.2, P268, P269, M84 and M290 in relation to the newly characterized mutations have not been resolved because of the lack of positive control DNAs.

See the phylogeny chart here:

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